Pompey Pillar

Pompey’s Pillar On a rocky hilltop in the middle of Alexandria lies the biggest memorial column

in Egypt “Pompey’s Pillar”. It is famous for being the only known free-standing

a column in Roman Egypt and one of the largest monoliths columns ever erected.

The pillar is 28m tall and 2.7 m wide of pure red granite and on its western

the upper side is a greek inscription dedicated to Emperor Diocletian.

Pompey Pillar

History

The roman ruler Diocletian constructed this column between 284-305 AD

to commemorate Diocletian’s victory in ending the people’s revolt to be freed

from the Roman rule, saving the public of Alexandria from famine, exempted

the public from paying tax so a memorial column created to show gratitude

to what Diocletian achieved in these harsh times. The pillar nicknamed

Pompey Pillar

as in the middle ages, the crusaders mistakenly believed that

the remains of the great Roman general Pompey in a pot at the very top of the pillar.

The location of the pillar  surrounded by many who remain to saw the conflicts of

ancient times unfold in front of its eyes. During the first centuries the patron

pagan god of Alexandria was the Serapeum (a symbol of ancient tradition) and

Pompey Pillar

his temple was located near the pillar also it was a time of religious conflict

as the ideas of Christianity began to gain popularity which led to the destruction

of many pagan temples & statues to the god Serapis dating back

to the reign of Ptolemy II and Ptolemy III in 391 AD.

as in the middle ages, the crusaders mistakenly believed that

the remains of the great Roman general Pompey in a pot at the very top of the pillar.

The location of the pillar  surrounded by many who remain to saw the conflicts of

Pompey Pillar

ancient times unfold in front of its eyes. During the first centuries the patron

pagan god of Alexandria was the Serapeum (a symbol of ancient tradition) and

his temple was located near the pillar also it was a time of religious conflict

as the ideas of Christianity began to gain popularity which led to the destruction

of many pagan temples & statues to the god Serapis dating back

to the reign of Ptolemy II and Ptolemy III in 391 AD.